Faculty of Information Technology, BUT

Course details

Information Systems Analysis and Design

AIS Acad. year 2009/2010 Winter semester 5 credits

Software process - software development lifecycle. Software modelling languages - structured modelling languages, modeling techniques in the UML 2.0. Introduction to project planning and tracking, project management. Software engineering tools. Introduction to Unified Process. Requirements analysis and specification. From requirements to software release - business object model, domain object model. Architectural design - layers, frameworks, patterns. Database design - mapping objects to a relational, object-oriented and object-relational database. business objects and persistence. Programming and testing. Refactoring. User interface design. Data engineering - data security and integrity, transactions and concurrency. Business components. A project oriented to requirement analysis and software design.

Guarantor

Language of instruction

Czech, English

Completion

Credit+Examination (written)

Time span

39 hrs lectures, 13 hrs projects

Assessment points

51 exam, 15 half-term test, 34 projects

Department

Lecturer

Instructor

Subject specific learning outcomes and competences

Students will know fundamentals of essential stages in information system development at a level, which is further evolved in specialized subjects. They are able to develop suitable models during information system requirements analysis and design, mainly in the UML language.

Generic learning outcomes and competences

Students will learn how to analyze a design solution of a given problem in a small team. They learn to present and defend  both partial and final results of the project.

Learning objectives

The goal of the subject is to give students knowledge of methods and tools used in information system development and to learn them to apply these methods and tools.

Study literature

  • Larman, C.: Applying UML and Patterns. An Introduction to Oject-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development. 3rd edition. Prentice Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River, USA, 2006, 703 p., ISBN 0-13-148906-2.
  • Maciaszek, L.A., Liong, B.L.: Practical Software Engineering. A Case Study Approach. Harlow England, Addison-Wesley, 2005, 864 p., ISBN 0-321-20465-4.
  • Arlow, J., Neustadt, I.: UML and the Unified Process: Practical Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. Addison-Wesley Professional, 2002, 416 p., ISBN 0-201-77060-1.

Fundamental literature

  • Larman, C.: Applying UML and Patterns. An Introduction to Oject-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development. 3rd edition. Prentice Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River, USA, 2006, 703 p., ISBN 0-13-148906-2.
  • Maciaszek, L.A., Liong, B.L.: Practical Software Engineering. A Case Study Approach. Addison-Wesley, Harlow England, 2005, 864 p., ISBN 0-321-20465-4. 
  • Arlow, J., Neustadt, I.: UML a unifikovaný proces vývoje aplikací. Computer Press, 2003, 408 s., ISBN: 80-7226-947-X.
  • Maciaszek, L.A.: Requirement Analysis and System Design, 2 ed. Addison-Wesley, Harlow England, 2005, 504 p., ISBN 0-321-20464-6.

Syllabus of lectures

    1. Software projects, OO development.
    2. Modeling techniques of the UML 2.0 - modelling of object structure and use cases.
    3. Modeling techniques of the UML 2.0 - modelling of interactions, states and activities, components and deployment. Other types of diagrams.
    4. Introduction to project planning and tracking, project management.
    5. Introduction to Unified Process. The phase of inception.
    6. The phase of elaboration, domain model.
    7. Architectural design - dependencies and their elimination, layers, architectural frameworks, patterns.
    8. Model-View-Controller pattern. Introduction to JEE and SOA.
    9. Design of classes - GRASP principles, design patterns.
    10. Programming, test-driven development, refactoring. 
    11. Data persistence object-relational mapping, data security.
    12. Modelling techniques and activities in next iterations.
    13. A lecture of an expert from industry.

Syllabus - others, projects and individual work of students

  • Informal requirement specification of a given part of an information system being solved as the project.
  • Requirements specification and design of the of the system in UML.

Progress assessment

A mid-term test, submitting project results and their defence  in due dates.

Controlled instruction

A mid-term test, realization of a project. The minimal number of points which can be obtained from the final exam is 20. Otherwise, no points will be assigned to the student.

Exam prerequisites

Duty credit consists of submitting and defending project results, and of obtaining at least 25 points for activities during semester.
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